Suggested readings, #32

Here are some interesting articles I’ve come across recently, for your consideration:

What John Rawls missed. Are his principles for a just society enough today? [Good article, though I remain convinced that Rawls missed precious little.] (New Republic)

A problem based reading of Nussbaum’s virtue ethics. [Yeah, there are a lot of problems there…] (Medium)

The meaning to life? A Darwinian existentialist has his answers. [Interesting observations about life, the universe, and everything from veteran philosopher of science Michael Ruse] (Aeon)

What Netflix can teach us about the paradox of choice. Today’s dizzying number of options might just be making us miserable. (Medium)

We don’t actually want to be happy. Chess helps answer the perennial human question, “What should I do next?” (New York Times)

The Spartan philosophy of life. Maxims from ancient Sparta still relevant today. (Medium)

The happiness ruse. How did feeling good become a matter of relentless, competitive work; a never-to-be-attained goal which makes us miserable? (Aeon)

Suggested readings, #31

Here are some interesting articles I’ve come across recently, for your consideration:

Bad Romance. Capitalism hasn’t disenchanted the world, a new book argues. Like a bad lover, it beguiles us into spiritual desolation—and only the most utopian politics will break its spell. (Boston Review)

Stoicism as a ball game. Sporting metaphors in ancient Stoic philosophy. (Medium)

Conceptual origami. Unfolding the social construction of mathematics. (Philosophy Now)

Sophie’s World: the wonder and glory of philosophy. “Ladies and gentlemen, we are floating in space.” (Medium)

Wonder works. History and philosophy should reveal to us the baffling, strange and wondrous qualities of other lives and other times. [Maybe, but this is a long-winded article with no particular point to make, so far as I can understand. Can someone please explain it to me?] (Aeon)

Suggested readings, #30

Here are some interesting articles I’ve come across recently, for your consideration:

Why the novel matters. We can try to bend the novel to fit our politics or culture, but it will always go its own way, making itself anew. (New Statesman)

How to eat like a Stoic. The ancient diets of Cynicism and Stoicism. (Medium)

What’s everything made of? To answer whether the fundamental building blocks of reality are particles, fields or both means thinking beyond physics. (Aeon)

A radical guide to spending less time on your phone. (Medium)

The powers and pitfalls of reality distortion. Reflections on the life and death of Steve Jobs. (Medium)

Suggested readings, #29

Here are some interesting articles I’ve come across recently, for your consideration:

The lesson history teaches is tragic. Though I’m slightly more optimistic than the author. (New York Times)

Kant against your Oculus Rift. (Medium)

What is Zizek for? A long, and long overdue, brutal take down of the philosopher-charlatan. (Current Affairs)

And speaking of charlatans, from the other side of the political spectrum: The shadow of Jordan Peterson. Snake-oil, lobsters and lazy-thinking. (Medium)

What the end of modern philosophy would look like. Interesting, though I’m going to disagree on the main point. Would have been nice if the author at least sketched what he thinks comes after modern philosophy. (Philosophical Salon)

How science fiction made me liberal. More than anything, the genre challenges us to imagine beyond the status quo. (Medium)

The magical thinking of weight loss. On major weight loss and praying at the altar of thinness. (Medium)

Suggested readings, #28

Here are some interesting articles I’ve come across recently, for your consideration:

The absurdity of the Nobel prizes in science. They distort the nature of the scientific enterprise, rewrite its history, and overlook many of its most important contributors. (Atlantic)

This is how normal life feels as a psychopath. Everyday, nonviolent psychopaths say they’re nothing like the psychopath we see on our movie screens. (Medium)

Elon Musk’s Starship may be more moral catastrophe than bold step in space exploration. (The Conversation)

Karl Popper, John Rawls & the paradox of tolerance. Ought we tolerate intolerance? (Medium)

“We are all clowns.” A defense of Joker. (The Philosophical Salon)

Suggested readings, #27

Here are some interesting articles I’ve come across recently, for your consideration:

The consciousness illusion. Phenomenal consciousness is a fiction written by our brains to help us track the impact that the world makes on us. (Or not, I’m going to write about this “illusion” craziness soon.) (Aeon)

I read one book 100 times over 10 years… Here are 100 Life-Changing lessons I learned. (About Marcus Aurelius’ Meditations) (Medium)

The fast track to a life well lived is feeling grateful. (I’m a bit skeptical about this sort of quick achievement of wisdom, still…) (Aeon)

Stoicism, insults, and political correctness. What Stoic philosophy would say about offensive behaviour. (Medium)

But is it science? Theoretical physicists who say the multiverse exists set a dangerous precedent: science based on zero empirical evidence. (Aeon)

Suggested readings, #26

Here are some interesting articles I’ve come across recently, for your consideration:

Overrated: Ludwig Wittgenstein. The Austrian philosopher and 20th-century genius disabled others and inspired decades of needless self-destruction among his disciples. (Standpoint Magazine)

Stoicism at the Athenian Acropolis. The view from above in Stoic philosophy. (Medium)

If the Louvre was on fire, should we rescue the art first or the people? (Well, can you tell me a bit more about those people of yours…?) (3 Quarks Daily)

There are no easy answers when it comes to eating consciously. New book “Messy Eating” gathers academics to discuss the philosophy of eating animals. (Medium)

Why love ends. (OUP Blog)

The simple art of not being miserable. (Actually, not that simple.) (Medium)