Suggested readings, #41

Here are some interesting articles I’ve come across recently, for your consideration:

Harvard just discovered that PowerPoint is worse than useless. Intuitively, anecdotally, and scientifically, PowerPoint may be the worst business [and educational] tool ever created. (inc.com)

How science fiction imagined the 2020s. What ‘Blade Runner,’ cyberpunk, and Octavia Butler had to say about the age we’re entering now. (Medium)

Behavioral economics’ latest bias: seeing bias wherever it looks. (Bloomberg)

The Stoicism of Augustus. The lost Exhortations to Philosophy. (Medium)

Death by design. We can chose how we live – why not how we leave? A free society should allow dying to be more deliberate and imaginative. (Aeon)

4 Japanese concepts to transform your state of mind. Sometimes we just don’t have the words. (Medium)

Scotland must not become another Catalonia. (Jacobin)

Suggested readings, #40

Here are some interesting articles I’ve come across recently, for your consideration:

Nobel winner retracts paper from Science. [This is not good, and not an isolated case either.] (Retraction Watch)

Getting to the Good Place. [About the philosophy-informed television show.] (Killing the Buddha)

Why historical analogy matters. (New York Review of Books)

If you’re so smart, why aren’t you rich? Turns out it’s just chance. The most successful people are not the most talented, just the luckiest, a new computer model of wealth creation confirms. [And it applies to science funding strategies as well.] (MIT Technology Review)

On Stoic transcendence. Stoic transcendence is an active exercise that takes us to a new level of understanding about the world. (The Side View)

Suggested readings, #39

Here are some interesting articles I’ve come across recently, for your consideration:

Kant, the champion of equality under the law and individual freedom, was a sexist. And for most of his life, he was also a racist. How do we deal with these facts in modern times, RUG philosopher Pauline Kleingeld wonders. ‘You can’t just cut out the bad parts.’ [Hint: you need to reinterpret his whole philosophy.] (Ukrant)

Stoicism versus Jordan Peterson. [A lengthy and well done analysis by Don Robertson.] (Medium)

Where is my mind? The rise and fall of the claustrum epitomizes the hunt for consciousness in the brain. (Nautilus)

Self-help, The Classics: No 1, Bertrand Russell’s The Conquest of Happiness. (Medium)

Science Fiction’s wonderful mistakes. The great novels of the 1960s remain enjoyable because they got everything wrong. (New Republic)

Was Socrates anti-democratic? [It’s complicated, in interesting ways…] (3QuarksDaily)

Suggested readings, #38

Here are some interesting articles I’ve come across recently, for your consideration:

The uncomfortable limits of human knowledge. Does science describe experience or truth? (The Scientist)

Rules or citizens? Ancient Athenian and Greek practices afford us insights into how and why to maintain real accountability in public life. (Aeon)

Sick of this market-driven world? You should be. The self-serving con of neoliberalism is that it has eroded the human values the market was supposed to emancipate. (Guardian)

The moral philosophy of The Good Place. The geniuses behind TV’s most philosophically inclined sitcom discuss what it means to be a good person. (Vox)

When truth and reason are no longer enough. In his (no longer so) new book, Steven Pinker is curiously blind to the power and benefits of small-town values. (Atlantic)

Suggested readings, #37

Here are some interesting articles I’ve come across recently, for your consideration:

Is it wrong to enjoy violent horror films? [I actually don’t find the author’s argument too convincing, but it’s a good question to ask.] (Justice Everywhere)

Divinely ordained individualism: Cicero’s natural law. (Medium)

Why the laws of nature are not inevitable, never have been, and never will be. (BackReaction)

Could the meaning of life be Lorem Ipsum? The philosophy hidden in garbage placeholder Text. (Medium)

Is the quest for immortality worse than death? Silicon Valley entrepreneurs are obsessed with prolonging life – but they could be deluded in what they wish for. (New Statesman)

Suggested readings, #36

Here are some interesting articles I’ve come across recently, for your consideration:

I’m a vegetarian—Will I eat lab-grown meat? Say my Thanksgiving turkey were cultured from stem cells in a lab. That eliminates some—but not all—of my ethical and environmental concerns. (Wired)

Lessons from Seneca. What can we learn today from his life and philosophy? (Medium)

Is virtue signaling a perversion of morality? [It’s complicated, and the author relies a bit too much on pop evopsych. Still.] (Aeon)

The neuroscience of anxiety. [For once, a “the neuroscience of…” article that is actually useful.] (Medium)

Does the many-worlds interpretation hold the key to spacetime? [Critical, yet still far too charitable, toward mathematically-inspired metaphysics like the many-worlds interpretation.] (Physics Today)

The science against [unmoderated] pleasure seeking. (Medium)

Could I be my own soul mate? Maybe Emma Watson and Lizzo are on to something. [Despite the silly title, the author is onto something.] (New York Times)

Suggested readings, #35

Here are some interesting articles I’ve come across recently, for your consideration:

Einstein in Athens. Modern science is unwittingly echoing Aristotle — and still has much to learn from him. [So says the author. After having read the whole long piece, I ain’t convinced.] (The New Atlantis)

The ‘Perfect Friendship,’ According to Aristotle. Why do some friendships last and others fade? (Medium)

The media’s coverage of AI is bogus. Claims that machine learning can predict sexuality, psychosis, and more are greatly overblown. (Scientific American)

Try this Stoic writing exercise and get to the heart of the real thing. (Medium)

The power of anonymous. Is the figure of the author bad for literature? Un-authored Roman literature and the transcendence of mere individuality. [A bit too much on the post-modern side of things for my taste, but several interesting observations nevertheless.] (Aeon)