Suggested readings, #21

Here are some interesting articles I’ve come across recently, for your consideration:

Happiness, death & the remainder of life — a little thought experiment. (Philosophy Now)

Quantum Darwinism may (or may not) be the solution to the problem of bridging the gap between quantum and classical physics. One thing for sure, though, contra this article, it has nothing to do with Darwinism. (Quanta Magazine)

Peter Singer pushes back against Jonathan Haidt’s claim that there is no point in teaching moral philosophy. The push, however, is far too gentle, as there are huge flaws in both Haidt’s data and his reasoning. (Korea Herald)

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Suggested readings, #20

Here are some interesting articles I’ve come across recently, for your consideration:

“And the prize for speculation goes to…” How physics went down a post-empirical dead end. Theoretical physicists who devised a theory for which there is no evidence have received a $3m award. Why is this not surprising? (Prospect Magazine)

Why Philosophers Shouldn’t Sign Petitions. Our job – says the author – is to persuade by argument, not by wielding influence. But I think she doesn’t know what petitions are for. They are not arguments meant at persuading. (New York Times)

How quantitative thinking shaped our worldview. (OUP Blog)

Debunking debunked. Secular modernity requires the weeding out of all the baloney. Yet it’s not clear that we are any less credulous than before. (Aeon)

Mocking Nature. Whereby the author brings a Green perspective to discussions of religious insult. Not sure I buy it, but here it is. (Philosophy Now)

Suggested readings, #19

Here are some interesting articles I’ve come across recently, for your consideration:

Late in life, Thoreau became a serious Darwinist. But he died before he could finish his book on natural history. As Emerson put it, Thoreau “depart[ed] out of Nature before … he has been really shown to his peers for what he is.” (Longreads)

Hell is other people, on the internet. Are we having fun, or are we in a hell where we’re merely communicating, learning too little too quickly, melting our brains into the abyssal portal? (The Baffler)

Quantum supremacy is coming. It won’t change the world. If quantum computers are to help solve humanity’s problems, they will have to improve drastically. (The Guardian)

The 10 ancient classics every student should read. As students we’re buried in reading and assignments. But if you want to increase your knowledge, get out your comfort zone and entertain yourself, the original Classics aren’t a bad place to start. (The Independent)

Why speaking to yourself in the third person makes you wiser. (Aeon)

Suggested readings, #18

Here are some interesting articles I’ve come across recently, for your consideration:

Cruising in the age of consent: gay men, #metoo, and the politics of desire. (The Atlantic)

Is attributing evil a cognitive bias? Interesting article, with some questionable evolutionary psychological interpretations. (Philosophy Now)

Quentin Tarantino’s Cosmic Justice: his new film exhibits — perhaps surprisingly — a genuine moral pathos. (New York Times)

The problem with mindfulness: it promotes itself as value-neutral but it is loaded with (troubling) assumptions about the self and the cosmos. (Aeon)

A power ranking of Sherlock Holmes adaptations: the consummate detective has been reimagined hundreds of times—which screen version is best? (Electric Literature)

Suggested readings, #17

Here are some interesting articles I’ve come across recently, for your consideration:

Philosophy of science: the first 2.5 millennia. Too bad it stops at Feyerabend… (Philosophy Now)

The worst patients in the world. Americans are hypochondriacs, yet we skip our checkups. We demand drugs we don’t need, and fail to take the ones we do. No wonder the U.S. leads the world in health spending. (The Atlantic)

Was The Odyssey the first Greek novel? (Lit Hub)

The physics of causality: why do we remember the past and not the future? Untangling the connections between cause and effect, choice, and entropy. (FQXi Community)

Libraries in the ancient world, a short (and somewhat surprising) history. (Ancient History Encyclopedia)

Suggested readings, #16

Here are some interesting articles I’ve come across recently, for your consideration:

Pandora’s Vox: thousands of years ago, the ancient Greeks anticipated robots and artificial intelligence—and they didn’t trust them. (Foreign Policy)

In search of lost time: on the current role and future tasks of philosophy. (Eurozine)

Tainted by association: would you carve a roast with a knife that had been used in a murder? Why not? And what does this tell us about ethics? (Aeon)

The problem with HR: for 30 years, we’ve trusted human-resources departments to prevent and address workplace sexual harassment. How’s that working out? (The Atlantic)

Aristotle and the good ruler: what politicians can learn from Aristotle’s Politics. (Philosophy Now)

Suggested readings, #15

Here are some interesting articles I’ve come across recently, for your consideration:

You would think this does not need to be said, and yet: Let the professors run the university. Faculty members need to reassert themselves as the people who direct discourse on campuses. (Inside Higher Education)

No, we probably don’t live in a computer simulation, very sensibly says physicist Sabine Hossenfelder. (BackReaction)

Democracy is for the gods, and it should be no surprise that humans cannot sustain it. (New York Times)

Social physics: despite the vagaries of free will and circumstance, human behavior in bulk is far more predictable than we like to imagine. (Aeon)

Socrates’ critique of 21st-Century neuroscience: the ancient thinker saw limits to what natural science can tell us about ourselves. (Scientific American)